Content Image

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

We need scholars who not only skillfully explore the frontiers of knowledge, but also integrate ideas, connect thought to action, and inspire students.
Ernest L. Boyer

Compared to even a decade ago, the phrase "scholarship of teaching and learnng," or SoTL, is more commonplace in the academy. Indeed, it has become the shorthand for a rich array of classroom-based research—conducted by faculty from two- and four-year institutions—which include discipline-specific and interdisciplinary scholarship. Websites, scholarly journals, international conferences and institutes showcase a focus on teaching as a worthy aspect of faculty inquiry.

The movement to recognize teaching as a respected scholarly activity began with the 1990 publication of Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities of the Professoriate by Ernest Boyer—then president of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching—who wondered, "Is it possible to define the work of faculty in ways that reflect more realistically the full range of academic and civic mandates?" He went on to argue that the debate about teaching versus research should be laid to rest, and in its place the honorable term of "scholarship" should be given a far broader meaning to encompass the full scope of four distinct yet overlapping notions of scholarship: discovery, integration, application, and teaching. This reframing of teaching as scholarly work resonated with faculty in universities and community colleges, and fueled early work on faculty teaching portfolios.

Three scholars involved in SoTL work from its initiation—Pat Hutchings, Mary Taylor Huber, and Anthony Ciccone—review the lessons from two decades of work as well as emerging challenges in The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Reconsidered: Institutional Integration and Impact. Their 2011 analysis is especially interesting for the learning communities movement since its historical trajectory has been informed by the work of SoTL practitioners.

Resources

Why Does the Faculty Resist Change?
John Tagg. Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning. January/February 2012.

The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Reconsidered: Institutional Integration and Impact
Pat Hutchings, Mary Taylor Huber, and Anthony Ciccone. See in particular, Chapter 2, Teachers and Learning. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. 2011.

Engendering Faculty Professional Growth
KerryAnn O'Meara and Aimee LaPointe Terosky. Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning. November/December 2010.

Helping College Students Find Purpose: The Campus Guide to Meaning-Making
Robert J. Nash and Michele C. Murray. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. 2010. See especially, Chapter 4, A Pedagogy of Constructivism: Deep-Meaning Learning.

The Messy Teaching Conversation: Toward a Model of Collegial Reflection, Exchange, and Scholarship on Classroom Problems
Heidi L. Johnsen, Michelle Pacht, Phyllis van Slyck, and Ting Man Tsao. Teaching English in the Two-Year College 37:2. December 2009. Subscribe

Faculty Inquiry in Action: Guidelines for Working Together to Improve Student Learning
Excerpt. A Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation project for Strengthening Pre-Collegiate Education in Community Colleges. 2008.

Teaching and Learning in the Service of Transformation
Charles R. Foster. Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning. May/June 2007.

The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
William E. Becker and Moya L. Andrews, editors. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press. 2004.

Teaching as Community Property: Essays on Higher Education
Lee S. Shulman. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. 2004.

The Wisdom of Practice: Essays on Teaching, Learning, and Learning to Teach
Lee S. Shulman. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. 2004.

Creating a Reflective Space: The Teaching and Learning Academy at Western Washington University
Carmen Werder, PJ Redmond, Jeff Purdue, and Kathryn Patrick. Washington Center News. Fall 2003.

Disciplinary Styles in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Exploring Common Ground
Mary Taylor Huber and Sherwyn P. Morreale, editors. Washngton, DC: American Association for Higher Education and The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 2002.

Scholarship in the Postmodern Era: New Venues, New Values, New Visions
Kenneth J. Zahorski, editor. New Directions for Teaching and Learning 90. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. 2002.

The Evidence Process: A Collaborative Approach to Understanding and Improving Teaching and Learning
Evidence Project staff. Cambridge, MA: Project Zero, Harvard School of Education. 2001.

Opening Lines: Approaches to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
Pat Hutchings, editor. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning. 2000.

Inspiring Teaching: Carnegie Professors of the Year Speak
John K. Roth, editor. Boston, MA: Anker Publishing. 1997.

Scholarship Assessed: Evaluation of the Professoriate
Charles E. Glassick, Mary Taylor Huber, and Gene I. Maeroff. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. 1997.

Classroom Research: Implementing the Scholarship of Teaching
K. Patricia Cross and Mimi Harris Steadman. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. 1996.

Enhancing Student Learning: Intellectual, Social, and Emotional Integration
Patrick G. Love and Anne Goodsell Love. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 4. 1995. A summary is available on this website.

Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities of the Professoriate
Ernest L. Boyer. Princeton, NJ: Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 1990.

The Reflective Practitioner: How Professionals Think in Action
Donald A. Schon. New York, NY: Basic Books. 1983.

Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
Website.

International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
Website.

Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
Website.

Complete list of resources